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Community Project Funding Requests

On April 27th, Congresswoman McClain submitted the following to the Appropriations Committee under the Community Project Funding Program. These projects will be evaluated by the Committee to potentially be funded under the 2022 Fiscal Year Appropriations.

*Projects are listed in alphabetical order

 

Proposed Recipient: City of Croswell
Recipient Address: 100 N. Howard Ave. Croswell, MI 48422.
Amount Requested: $1,000,000
Explanation of Request:

            The inadequate water mains will be replaced with new mains constructed of modern acceptable materials. This will allow for an economically disadvantaged community to be a national example of how to resolve poor water quality issues before they become a larger concern. In doing so, the City of Croswell will ensure the highest caliber of public infrastructure, and improved reliability. This will eliminate contamination caused by breaks or leaks and will improve water pressure to safe levels.

            This project is an appropriate use of taxpayer resources because it will improve the health safety and welfare of the public drinking water system for the users of the City of Croswell public drinking water system.

 

Proposed Recipient: Charter Township of Shelby
Project Title: Shelby Water Reservoir
Recipient Address: 52700 Van Dyke Ave., Shelby Township, MI 48316
Amount Requested: $1,000,000
Explanation of Request:

This project would be a valuable use of taxpayer funds because Shelby Township’s water distribution system provides a reliable source of safe quality drinking water to over 80,000 residents, businesses, medical facilities, governmental agencies, schools and users. The Township is a Tier One customer to the Great Lakes Water Authority (GLWA) and purchases clean potable water from them. The Township was recently advised that water usage, during GLWA coincidental peak periods, has exceeded their contractual limits on several occasions. In keeping with good system management philosophy, after careful consideration and investigative analysis, it was determined that the installation of a 3.5 million gallon Water Reservoir Facility within the system, at a strategic location, would mitigate these exceedances and serve to lower water purchase rates from GLWA, thus benefiting all Township customers. Additionally, this assists the GLWA in managing and reducing costs to their customer base which includes approximately 4,000,000 customers.

Providing safe affordable water to its customers, on a consistent and reliable basis, is an obligation that requires a thorough understanding of the system and its related assets. Once the water enters Shelby’s system it is transported and delivered throughout the Township. This water distribution system is comprised of over 410 miles of watermains, of varied size, and many components, some visible and some not, that contribute to its ability to effectively and efficiently serve over 80,000 residents, businesses and users on a daily basis.

This is a shovel ready project, the anticipated construction time associated with this facility is estimated at 8 or 9 months for substantial completion and system operation, which is aggressive but consistent with the needs of the Township’s and GLWA’s customer base. Upon completion of construction of this Water Reservoir Facility an important component of the Township’s water distribution system will be available to the benefit of the entire Township’s health, safety and welfare. This facility will be designed to equalize water demands, reduce pressure fluctuations in the distribution system and to manage and reduce rates to users of the system. Additionally, this facility can be used to provide other benefits such as reserves for firefighting, power outages and other emergencies.  Granting of this request will allow a program that focuses on improved public safety, reliability and service throughout the system.

 

Proposed Recipient: Harrison Township
Project Title: Sanitary Sewer Project
Recipient Address: 38151 L'Anse Creuse, Harrison Twp., MI 48045
Amount Requested: $1,000,000
Explanation of Request:

Harrison Township is uniquely located on the shores of Lake St. Clair, with the Clinton River running through the center of the community. The majority of the residents are connected to the regional sanitary sewer system, but there are approximately 500 homes in the center of the township that are serviced by individual septic sewer systems. These septic systems are subject to failure, which leads to sewage leaching from the septic field into the storm drainage system. All of the storm drains in the township flow out to the Clinton River or Lake St. Clair, so these failing septic systems lead to Great Lakes water pollution. Harrison Township recently approved $55,000 in engineering services to prepare plans for sanitary sewers for this neighborhood.

This project would be a valuable use of taxpayer funds because it would significantly improve water quality for Lake St. Clair and the Great Lakes for many generations to come. Harrison Township anticipates an overall construction cost of $6 million (including engineering and contingency funds) and would welcome any portion of that cost to be funded by this program.

 

Proposed Recipient: Macomb Interceptor Drain Drainage District (MIDDD)
Recipient Address: 21777 Dunham Road, Clinton Township, MI 48036
Amount Requested: $1,000,000
Explanation of Request:

In 2016, a catastrophic sinkhole occurred on the Macomb Interceptor Drain (MID) that destabilized the sewage system for over 800,000 Macomb County residents and businesses. Subsequent examination of all segments of the system showed additional sites of imminent failure and a plan has been made to rehabilitate the entire MID system. Segment 6 is the second section of the pipe that is being rehabilitated with the cost of $16 Million. This project is essential for the continuation of adequate sewage disposal in the drainage district, which includes the communities of Sterling Heights, Shelby Township, Utica, Macomb Township, Chesterfield Township, New Haven, and Harrison Township, Lenox, and Washington Township.

During the extensive sewer examination of the entire MID system, it was discovered that hydrogen sulfide gas had degraded the interior of the pipe. To minimize the damaging effects of hydrogen sulfide gas, we are applying to fund the Foul Air Duct (FAD) system, an essential component of this project. The FAD transports damaging hydrogen sulfide from the sewer system. Eliminating hydrogen sulfide from the system will extend the useful life of the sewer and help to prevent future costly failures. The total cost of the FAD system is $1.3 Million. I am requesting federal funding of $1 Million for the FAD system; $300,000 will be paid by the Macomb Interceptor Drain Drainage District in matching funds.

 

Proposed Recipient: St. Clair County
Recipient Address: 200 Grand River Avenue, Suite 203, Port Huron, MI 48060
Amount Requested: $1,000,000
Explanation of Request:

The City’s drinking water system is comprised of the distribution system and Water Treatment Plant (WTP). The water distribution system was originally developed in 1919 with approximately 62 miles of water main within the system ranging in size from four to 20 inches in diameter. The water mains are primarily made from either cast iron or ductile iron with a small percentage (less than 3%) made from Asbestos-Cement (AC), HDPE, and concrete. The system also contains approximately six-hundred and fifty (650) fire hydrants and eight-hundred and twenty (820) valves.  Water main breaks, undersized pipes, and diminished domestic and fire flows necessitate the need for replacements. With the ages of the fire hydrants and gate valves, these appurtenances have become inoperable requiring their replacements during Phase 1 of the project. The replacements of water main, fire hydrants and gate valves will improve water quality, reliability, and protection for the residents and businesses within the City.  This will include the replacement of 20 lead service lines in Phase 2 of the project.

Funding the improvements to the Marysville wastewater and drinking water systems would be a valuable use of taxpayer funds, as the improvements will result in improved water quality, improved system reliability, and enhanced public safety and protection for residents and businesses within the City.  Marysville is home to a diverse mix of industrial manufacturing firms that rely on safe, efficient infrastructure to accommodate their operations. 

 

Proposed Recipient: St. Clair County
Recipient Address: 200 Grand River Avenue, Suite 203, Port Huron, MI 48060
Amount Requested: $1,000,000
Explanation of Request:

The wastewater infrastructure system of Clay Township and Ira Township provides the collection and conveyance of wastewater to the St. Clair County Department of Public Works Waste Water Treatment Plant and protects local water resources by discharging clean water through an advanced treatment process. A comprehensive investigation of the facilities in 2019-2020 indicated that significant portions of the system experienced accelerated deterioration, primarily induced by areas of high turbulence and hydrogen sulfide chemical attack. These assets are located along a state highway (M-29) that is the primary travel route around Anchor Bay, within and near the Michigan Department of Natural Resources’ St. John’s Marsh Wildlife Area, and adjacent to numerous canals that directly outlet to the St. Clair River and Lake St. Clair.  The overall project repairs and rehabilitates approximately 8,000 feet of 30-inch interceptor, 14,000 feet of 27-inch interceptor, 99 manholes, approximately 2.4 miles of 16-inch force main, and a triplex submersible lift station. The lift station has a concrete well that is 9 feet in diameter, and 30 feet in depth. These facilities were originally installed in the 1970s and have not been rehabilitated since. 

This vital project would be a valuable use of taxpayer money because rehabilitating the aging infrastructure will protect the significant natural resources in and around these coastal communities, situated along two major Great Lakes connecting waterways.  As communities like Clay Township and Ira Township have developed and aged, the underground infrastructure is deteriorating. The townships need to systematically repair rehabilitate the interceptor’s aging components so that residents and businesses experience a consistent level of service in order to avoid the following:

  • Increased threat of sewer backups and property damage for residents and businesses,
  • Increased potential for significant environmental damage, and
  • Increased potential for impassable roadways due to failed infrastructure.